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Clean Up in Aisle 12. Sponsored by…

28 May

Asian grocery noodle aisleSome of the world’s largest retailers have their sights set on garnering a larger share of the ad market. And why not. Amazon is expected to generate $11 billion in advertising revenue this year, growing to $15 billion in 2020 (source: eMarketer).

So it comes as no surprise to learn that other retailers have taken steps to shore up their ad platforms. In April, Walmart acquired Silicon Valley-based Polymorph Labs and their content sensitive digital ad serving and analytical capabilities to help strengthen its Walmart Media Group and Target is rumored to be interested in acquiring WPP’s Triad Retail Media unit to support its Roundel media division. All three retailers are actively courting advertisers and their agency partners to pitch the media and product sales benefits of their data driven advertising offerings.

On one hand, one might question why is this even newsworthy? Traditional retailers have long been in the ad business, selling advertising to the brands that they carry on in-store media, in weekly ad circulars, in price-item television and radio spots and in OOH. Thus the expanded focus on sophisticated, data-driven digital advertising solutions should come as no surprise.

That said, the potential to integrate target audience information with web browsing data, shopper data and location data to serve up relevant ads in an environment where consumers can immediately click-to-buy and receive their merchandise in a day or two has the potential to revolutionize the retail ad industry.

As retailers refine their offering and simplify platform use, they will quickly cannibalize traditional search and digital display advertising activity. Factor in the ability to tap retailers omnichannel databases, with the goal of refining ad targeting to drive digital media efficiency and the appeal of retailer digital ad platforms increases exponentially.

Consider Walmart Media Group’s pitch to advertisers; with “90% of Americans shopping at Walmart every year” and “160 million visitors” in-store and online every week, Walmart Media Group helps brands to “reach more customers at scale and measure advertising effectiveness across the entire shopping journey.” 

On the surface this evolution of retail advertising certainly appears to be a win-win for the industry. Retailers benefit from a new, high margin revenue stream that is largely technology driven, relying on automated platforms. For the agency community, specialist agencies are already coming to the fore that focus exclusively on assisting brands in assessing and realizing opportunities associated with these retailer digital ad platforms. And, from a brand perspective, serving up targeted ads in a brand safe, fraud free environment with the potential to immediately convert consumer interest to sales is a compelling value proposition.

Perhaps the greatest challenge for manufacturers as more retailers join the fray, will be to balance the ongoing need to strengthen their brands and for some, to build their own direct-to-consumer offerings, while funding their participation in retailer digital ad platforms. Make no mistake, while a brand may be able to build a solid business case for investing with their retail partners, retailer leverage over brands to influence whether or not they buy-in and at what level will be real as the balance of power pendulum continues to swing in favor of omnichannel retailers.

 

 

 

 

Things Are Looking Up for Marketing

26 Apr

What do these seemingly disparate items have in common?

Building Momentum Clock Time Words Moving Forward

  • According to Gartner Research, North American and UK companies will spend 11.2% of corporate revenue on marketing in 2019.
  • Nearly two-thirds of CMOs are expecting to see marketing budgets rise this year.
  • The recent IPA Bellwether survey indicates that UK marketers saw an 8.7% increase in the size of their advertising budgets during the first-quarter of 2019.
  • Martech budgets will account for almost 30% of marketing expense budgets in 2019.
  • On the strength of its break-through brand building efforts Burger King is “cool againproclaims INSEAD.
  • Former Anheuser-Busch InBev CMO, Miguel Patricio is promoted to CEO of Kraft Heinz.

In short, organizational confidence in both marketing and marketers appears to be on the rise and zero-based budgeting (ZBB) has helped, not hindered marketing’s resurgence.

By way of background UK marketers, including Unilever and Diageo, have been at the forefront in adopting ZBB, AB InBev is a ZBB organization, 3G Capital, which owns Burger King and Kraft Heinz has employed ZBB. And finally, martech budgets are soaring because organizations have driven out marketing budget inefficiencies, applying savings to fund productivity enhancing research and innovation initiatives.

Over the last decade or so, marketers had to renew their focus on demonstrating that the marketing function could in fact drive business, including both top line revenue and net profit. Importantly, marketers had to do this at a time when companies had shifted their focus to cost management and categorized marketing as an expense… not an investment.

The message sent to marketing was clear, budgets and the success of the CMO would be tied to achieving quantifiable results that supported the organization’s goals. For many firms, ZBB was an integral part of this process. ZBB provided a framework for eliminating unproductive costs and identifying areas, which better supported firm strategies and that were worthy of financial support.

At a time when “faster, better, cheaper” has become a guiding principle and where big data and technological advances are driving dizzying rates of marketplace change, building a successful marketing infrastructure has become increasingly difficult. Yet, there are numerous indicators that would suggest things are moving in a positive direction. The structure, processes and accountability that is part and parcel of a ZBB process appears to have aided marketing’s resurgence.

In the words of American economist, Emily Greene Balch:

The future will be determined in part by happenings that it is impossible to foresee; it will also be influenced by trends that are now existent and observable.”

 

 

 

 

Heritage or Baggage. What’s Your Perspective?

2 Apr

ddb-content-logo2-2019-1320x660Two different agency holding companies, with two different perspectives on the value of brand heritage and the role that heritage will play in their respective cultures moving forward.

In late 2018, WPP made the announcement that it was going to merge J. Walter Thompson, the world’s oldest agency brand with Wunderman. The new agency was christened Wunderman Thompson. This came on the heels of WPP’s decision to consolidate digital agency VML with Young & Rubicam renaming the combined entity VMLY&R.

Make no mistake, we are proponents of the holding companies moves to consolidate their brands to streamline operations, improve accountability and to simplify marketer access to agency services. That said, for the nostalgics among us, it was sad to witness the disappearance of two of the industry’s most venerable brands.

Thus, we were pleasantly surprised when Omnicom introduced its new corporate identity for DDB in March. The firm chose to leverage its heritage, adapting its original logo and paying homage to its three founders Ned Doyle, Mac Dane and Bill Bernbach by incorporating the agency’s original name, Doyle Dane Bernbach into its new identity.

A spokesperson for the agency stated, “As other agencies are commoditizing their agency names and turning away from their founding principles and visions, DDB is doubling down on the values that Doyle, Dane and Bernbach founded our agency on – creativity and humanity.”

In the words of Bill Bernbach: “Getting your product known isn’t the answer. Getting it wanted is the answer.”  

Don’t Confuse Data-Centricity with Customer-Centricity

2 Apr

online mediaAd agencies and consultancies alike continue to focus their acquisition and consolidation strategies on “data” firms as they build-out their future service offerings.

One only has to consider Publicis Groupe’s recent advances toward Epsilon or note Interpublic’s 2018 acquisition of Acxiom and Dentsu Aegis’ acquisition of Merkle in 2016.

No one questions the importance of data analytics and its role in key aspects of the marketing process from target audience segmentation and enhanced digital media performance to optimizing lifetime customer value. However, adopting a data-centric mindset that focuses on lower funnel conversion tactics to satisfy advertisers’ near-term revenue generation needs should not be mistaken for a customer-centric approach to addressing the problems facing advertisers today.

To the extent that data immersion yields intelligence and insights that help position brands in a relevant and compelling manner to make it easier for consumers to associate themselves with those brands that is good. But if the focus is to forgo brand building in the hope of driving results through the creation of on-demand experiences with the goal of driving conversion, the risk is that marketers may simply annoy consumers and not endear their brands to their target audience.

A fundamental question to be addressed is: “Why is it that in the age of “big data” customers are becoming less brand loyal?”

Perhaps the focus should be data analytics ability to generate insights that inform brand strategy, boost a brand’s emotional appeal, build its value proposition and build an emotional connection with the consumer.

To this end, it was with great interest that I noted one of the key findings from PwC’s recent Retail Survey; “Consumers want benefits, not surveillance

2018 | Articles That Piqued Our Readers Interest

31 Dec

WTop 5ith 2018 now in our rearview mirror and all of our attention focused on the coming year, we thought that you might be interested in learning what our “Top 5” blog posts were over the past twelve months, according to our readers.

While familiar issues such as; trust, transparency and brand safety continued to be at the fore of advertisers’ attention, new topics including programmatic audio, AI-powered personalization and federal privacy regulation crept into our field of view. Click below to access 2018’s top posts.

  1. 3 Keys to Strengthening Client-Agency Relationships
  2. 4 Keys for Optimizing Direct Labor Based Remuneration Systems
  3. Agency Compensation: The More for Less Trap
  4. Advertisers: What Does the DOJ Know About the Ad Industry That You Don’t?
  5. Will Programmatic Ever Address Advertiser Concerns?

One Hundred Years Later. Has Anything Really Changed?

27 Dec

Sears Catalog CoverWe’re all familiar with the old adage: “The more things change, the more they remain the same.” Strange as that may sound, the notion behind this saying is simple. No matter how complex a situation may appear, nor the rate or nature of changes that we may be dealing with, there tends to be an underlying corollary that remains constant.

To test this hypothesis, I spent some time browsing through the archives of Duke University’s John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History to gain a perspective on what marketers were dealing with at the beginning of the twentieth-century. As importantly, I wanted to compare their reality with the environment in which we operate today.

Surely the fundamentals facing marketers had to have changed, I reasoned. There have simply been too many advancements and technological improvements for the aforementioned adage to hold true. However, a quick review of some key events then and now might suggest otherwise… you be the judge:

Then

  • 1915 – Millions of dollars are spent on advertising and public relations to stimulate consumer demand
  • 1915 –  Modern market research begins, resulting in ads being increasingly targeted to specific audiences
  • 1915 – The first transcontinental telephone line opens from NY to San Francisco
  • 1916 – Self-Service retailing is invented by the Piggly Wiggly chain of grocery stores
  • 1916 – U.S. automotive and truck production exceeds one million new units
  • 1918 – The New York Times begins home delivery
  • 1918 – Ad legend James Walter Thompson sells his namesake agency to Stanley B. Resor and partners
  • 1918 – The Federal Government takes control of the nation’s telephone and telegraph systems
  • 1921 – Badly hurt by the depression, Sears, Roebuck & Company Chairman Julius Rosenwald pledged $21 million of his own funds to bail the company out

Now

  • 2018 – Billions of dollars are spent on advertising and earned media to stimulate consumer demand
  • 2018 – AI aided market research and predictive analytics allow marketers to better chart the consumer journey
  • 2018 – Number of worldwide mobile phone users expected to pass 5.0 billion
  • 2018 – Amazon Go unveils revolutionary check-out free convenience stores
  • 2018 – U.S. Plug-in-Electric Vehicle sales estimated to eclipse 400,000 units
  • 2018 – The New York Times achieves 2 million digital only subscribers
  • 2018 – The J. Walter Thompson brand is merged with Wunderman to form Wunderman Thompson
  • 2018 – The Federal Communications Commission repeals net neutrality rules
  • 2018 – Sears files for bankruptcy, closing 140+ stores, Chairman Eddie Lampert submits $4.4 billion bid to buy the chain and stave off closure

While the size and scale of the issues that our industry was dealing with are certainly different, the fundamentals are actually more similar than not. Whether in the context of advancements in retail models or modes of media distribution to the impact of emerging product sectors and government regulation or even developments related to changes in agency ownership, there is a certain “sameness” to our industry… even after an eventful 100 years.

Hopefully we can find comfort in the aforementioned adage and confidence in the fact that our predecessors were able to successfully navigate the challenges which they faced to help create what has become one of the world’s most stimulating and dynamic business sectors, advertising and marketing.

As we reflect on the passing of another year and contemplate the challenges and opportunities that will present themselves to us in 2019 all of us at AARM would like to offer up an old Irish toast to each of you:

May the best day of your past be the worst day of your future. May your troubles be less and your blessings be more and nothing but happiness come through your door.

Marketers: Are you Optimizing Your Data?

16 Aug

Vision MissionWith the dramatic expansion of data availability and the explosion in marketing technology solutions ranging from Data Management Platforms (DMPs), Demand Side Platforms (DSPs) and A/B Testing Platforms to name a few, the opportunity for marketers to optimize the data available to them to improve execution has never been greater.

Yet, too few marketers and their agencies are fully utilizing these tools to synthesize this data to drive marketing insights that can boost the efficacy of their marketing investment. Mass personalization, the mapping of customer journeys and the ability to improve the organization’s responsivity to competitor actions and market conditions are all possibilities if these tools are properly deployed.

If you feel as though your company could deliver greater value from the investment it has already made in martech, you will want to read this article from McKinsey & Company entitled; “Making the Most of Marketing Technology to Drive Growth.” Read More

Life in a Post-GDPR World

28 May

GDPR LogoWhat can advertisers posit from the early market indicators in the wake of the May 25, 2018 enforcement of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

There are three takeaways that would seem to portend the near-term challenges for the ad industry:

  1. Consumers aren’t that interested in allowing companies to use their personally identifiable information to target them, contact them, monitor their online behavior or to profit from the sale of that information.
  2. The advertising industry as a whole was not prepared for the onset of the GDPR.
  3. Limitations on access to consumer data could greatly impair the efficacy of programmatic media.

The results of poll recently announced by TopLineComms found that 41% of those surveyed were “planning to opt out of current email subscriptions” with 82% indicating that they were “concerned about how companies use their data.” Many believe that the news surrounding the recent Cambridge Analytica scandal has helped to fuel consumer concerns about data privacy protection. Either way, consumers increasingly want their privacy protected and both marketers and publishers are going to have to find ways to deal with that concern and the growth in global regulatory actions in this area.

Adopted in April of 2016, the advertising industry had a two-year transition period too ready for the May 25, 2018 date, when the GDPR regulations would become enforceable. Unfortunately, too many companies proved to be lax in their preparations. According to a global study conducted by SAP Hybris, “49% of companies either have no plan for compliance or have not yet implemented one.” Readiness was made more complex because of different regulatory compliance burdens for data controllers and data processors and the role of third-party data processors. Gaining clarity among stakeholders as to who was responsible for what and how they were progressing on their compliance readiness proved challenging at best.

While early in the process, since GDPR went into effect, ad exchanges have seen dramatic drops in ad demand, with exchange volumes dropping up to 40%. According to digiday.com, “some U.S. publishers have halted all programmatic ads on their European sites.” In turn, this has led to a drop in publisher inventory in Europe. Of note, many within the industry are blaming Google for its lack of preparation and the company’s inability to vouch for whether or not its third-party exchange partners were compliant or not heading into May 25th. Unfortunately, Google did not notify advertisers of this issue until May 24th leaving them little “time to change media-buying tactics or inform clients.”

In addition, Google, Facebook and a couple of other internet portals have been hit with complaints and potential legal action by independent consumer advocacy groups over “forced consent,” claiming those entities threatened service cutoffs or restricted access if consumers did not consent to Google and Facebook’s privacy and data usage terms.

Near-term, organizations will have to focus on complying with GDPR. Looking ahead marketers, publishers and ad tech providers will need too ready for the likely expansion of privacy protection regulations to other countries and municipalities (e.g. California Consumer Privacy Act). After all, these new regulations are coming at a time when the importance of data and the value that it plays in an organization’s corporate strategy and marketing efforts has never been more critical. 

Perhaps most importantly, organizations will have to focus on developing sensible solutions to placate consumers that have legitimate concerns about how their personally identifiable information will be used. This is a necessary step if using first-party data to inform audience segmentation decisions, personalize consumer communications and monitor behavior is deemed a critical element in their marketing and content strategies.

Achieving these goals will require ongoing remediation efforts and will involve personnel from many disciplines within an organization. It is for this reason that many firms may turn to appointing a Data Protection “Tsar” to lead their efforts to embellish their consumer privacy protection policies, processes and compliance efforts. Not a bad move for companies that have the means to formalize this function.

In spite of the inauspicious start by many to comply with the GDPR regulations it is never too late to heed the old adage; “Proper preparation prevents poor performance.

 

 

 

 

Keeping Pace with the Rate of Change in Ad Industry Can be a Challenge

31 Jan

lexiconDo you sometimes wonder how you will ever keep up with the dizzying array of change that has become a constant in the ad industry? The good news is that you may not be alone in your angst. Just take a look at how industry lexicon has evolved in recent years to reflect the technological changes that the industry is dealing with and one can easily surmise why practitioners feel stressed out…

Industry Lexicon for the 21st Century

Algorithm, artificial intelligence, programmatic media buying, header bidding, second-price auctions, big data, fraud, domain spoofing, viewability, demand side platform, Pinterest, supply side platform, data management platform. Ad tech, exchange, tech stack, human marketing, voice activation, block chain technology, deep learning, managed service model, the duopoly, GDPR, hyperlocal media, ad spoofing, biometric recognition, virtual reality, winning bid log metadata files, econometrics, transparency, martech, Facebook, linear TV, Snapchat, digital content production, ad tech integration, ads.text, brand safety, publisher addressable marketplace, blackhat SEO, walled gardens, proprietary tech integration, trading desks, principal-based buying, PII-based consumer ID’s, brand safe environments, push notifications, mobile-app fraud, spoof impressions, ad networks, e-commerce analytics platform, contextual fit, attribution fraud, HULU, curated inventory, general data protection regulation, CX strategy, cyber security, white list, multi-screen viewing, bid management fees, Instagram, PAM, PII based identifiers, automated monetization, onboard connected TV, app-install, exchanges, click spam, downstream metrics, dynamic creative optimization, sustainable ecosystems, dynamic personalization, performance media platform, extremist content, audience engagement, monetization, fake followers, hard news, enterprise brands, CPI, retargeting, data controller, software development kits, mediation products, combinatorial bidding, people-based marketing, waterfalling,  trust, content recommendation guarantees, Alexa, frequency capping, probabilistic methodology, addressable IDs, over-the-top video streaming, TAG, streaming environments, cross-channel messaging, influencer marketing, direct-to-consumer brands, brand activation, experiential marketing, growth hacking, social selling, fake news, user generated content, storytelling, illegitimate traffic sourcing, private marketplaces, sandboxing, non-human viewing, synchronized nodes, decentralized ad networks, voice assistants, cross-channel attribution, verification technologies, internet of things, personalization, social search, facial recognition platforms, 3-D printing, hyper-relevance, automated buying, voice activation, first-price ad auction, AI machine learning, in-home sensors, smart re-ordering services, digital workspace, multi-channel ecosystem, native advertising, organic posts, privacy settings and controls, FVOD free-video-on-demand, clearing price, net neutrality, invisible bots, Spotify, voice strategy, audio logos, autonomous vehicles, behavioral DNA, spot cloaking…

Never a dull moment for ad industry professionals to be sure. Consider the words of the twentieth century American writer, Alvin Toffler:

“Future shock is the shattering stress and disorientation that we induce in individuals by subjecting them to too much change in too short a time.” 

The questions to be considered are; “Can the industry sustain this rate of change, without compromising its ability to deliver? Can you?” Only time will tell.

 

Are We Missing the Real Issue with Ad Blockers?

26 Oct

blockerThe advertising industry is rightly concerned about the financial impact related to consumers growing use of ad blockers, which can filter out ads before users ever see them. A recent study by OnAudience.com highlights the reasons why:

  • 26% of U.S. consumers now use ad blockers, resulting in lost publisher revenues of $15.8 billion in 2016, up from $11.0 billion in 2015. The U.S. represents approximately $45 billion of the $100 billion global display market.
  • Internationally, the loss of publisher revenue from ad blocking is projected to rise to $42 billion, up from $28 billion in 2016.

In addition, Google has announced that the 2018 version of its Chrome web browser will allow consumers to automatically block “annoying, intrusive” ads, which will accelerate the financial impact of this trend given that Chrome represents approximately 60% of the desktop/mobile/tablet browser market (source: NETMARKETSHARE, September 2017). Google’s motivation, it claims, is that they are simply introducing the Coalition for Better Ads recently announced best practices standards to enhance the consumer’s web browsing experience.

It is no surprise how we got where we are. Advertisers wanted to improve consumer engagement and publishers wanted to drive revenues. This, in turn, led to publishers placing more ads on a web page, including higher paying video units, making ads larger or forcing visitors to somehow interact with these ads to get to the content. This involves video ads that automatically refresh or blast audio automatically or force consumers to wait for :05 to :10 seconds before they can access the content they seek.

In the end, advertisers and publishers have not realized greater levels of engagement, but rather helped to fuel greater levels of consumer irritation and therefore ad blocker usage.

Thus far, the industry has been focused on blocking the ad blockers. It is true that many publishers believe that being exposed to ads is a user’s obligation if they want their content to be free. Others, however, share the consumer’s disdain for obnoxious, intrusive ads, and would like to see them banned from their sites. The problem is that ad blockers tend to block all ads.

So what is the ad industry to do? Busting the use of ad blockers or implementing web browser workarounds would appear to be somewhat short-sighted. Consumers have clearly signaled that they find the level, number, positioning and type of online ads served to them on a regular basis to be discordant with their intended browsing habits. Pursuing a more measured approach on the part of the industry is warranted. As Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg intoned:

“Reacting in anger or annoyance will not advance one’s ability to persuade.”

The challenge is clear, finding a mechanism for publishers to fund their content creation at least in part through the use of online advertising. The answer, however, is not so readily apparent.

Let’s face it, by in large, consumers do not want to view online advertising. This can be evidenced by plummeting open and click-through rates, reductions in conversion rates and declines in average viewing times. Advertisers and publishers want “engagement” and sadly, consumers want nothing to do with most of the advertising foisted on them.

Is the answer better creative that informs, educates and entertains in the hope that users will both notice the ads and choose to interact with them? Or is it fewer, less intrusive ads that can take away from a user’s web browsing experience? Or will publishers finally have to solve the “pay to view” content dilemma, which consumers have largely been resistant to thus far?

If consumer engagement is the goal, the answer is likely “Yes” to all of the above.

 

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