Tag Archives: advertising agency

Don’t Start There

25 Jul

contract complianceMost would agree that the days of conducting business on a handshake are long gone. Make no mistake, honesty, forthrightness, trust and respectability are still qualities that we look for in our professional relationships. However, when it comes to transacting business the protection afforded to all parties is greatly enhanced with the use of a contract versus a verbal agreement marked by a handshake.

A verbal contract isnt worth the paper its written on.” ~ Samuel Goldwyn

The good news when it comes to the advertising industry, most client-agency relationships are governed by a contractual agreement. That said, there is one common mistake made by many advertisers when it comes to contracting with their agency partners… they start with the agency’s base contract.

Unfortunately, this creates a handful of challenges beginning with the fact that by its nature, agency contract templates are not client-centric. Then, when the advertiser turns the draft agreement over to counsel for review the document will likely require major modifications or, depending on counsel’s degree of advertising industry knowledge, there is a risk that key terms and conditions, which safeguard the advertiser’s interest will not be included in the agreement.

For advertisers, getting the contract “right” is important for two reasons. Firstly, the client-agency agreement establishes the legal nature of the relationship (e.g. principal-agent), while clearly articulating both stakeholders’ roles, responsibilities and rights. Secondly, the agreement establishes expectations and guidelines related to key aspects of the relationship, including; agency performance, staffing, remuneration, reporting, audit and record retention and intellectual property and data rights.

Over the course of the last several years the nature of client-agency relationships has certainly evolved with the advent of emerging technologies, changes in the regulatory environment and a move away from principal-agency relationships, which once held agencies to a much higher fiduciary standard. Thus it comes as no surprise that the complexity of the legal agreements that govern these relationships has increased dramatically.

Larger advertisers certainly benefit from working with marketing procurement departments and in-house counsel that are adept at contracting with a myriad of marketing vendors. Many organizations have developed standardized marketing vendor Master Services Agreements (MSAs) that can be used across their agency network, with some modification. These are typically “evergreen” agreements that don’t need to be renegotiated on an annual basis. Complimentary annual Statements of Work (SOW), which include key deliverables, agency staffing plans and remuneration program details are designed to be reviewed every year.

Additionally, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and The Incorporated Society of British Advertisers (ISBA) have both developed comprehensive, client-agency contract templates for use by their members that reflect industry “Best Practice” trends in this area. For small advertisers, or relationships with smaller, independent agency partners, the ANA and ISBA contract templates may not be wholly appropriate, but will provide a worthwhile guide for key terms and conditions that will certainly be applicable.

In our experience, advertisers will be much better served by taking this approach as opposed to accepting or attempting to retro-fit an agency’s base contract.

Of course, once the contract has been executed, marketing and advertising team personnel have an obligation to their organizations… monitoring contract compliance and financial management across each of their agency partners. The first step in this process, one which is often overlooked, is to socialize the agreement. Since an agreement is intended to serve as the basis for the client-agency relationship, it is important to share a summation of this agreement with those client-side individuals responsible for managing these important relationships.

As it relates to ongoing contract compliance monitoring tactics, these can include the tracking and reviewing agency time-of-staff commitments, retainer fee “burn” rates, budget control and project status reports and annual fee reconciliations. Progressive advertisers compliment these efforts with periodic business review meetings (i.e. quarterly or semi-annually) and by conducting independent agency contract compliance audits every year or two.

Good contracts can be the building block for great relationships. The time and effort invested in fashioning them and insuring compliance to them will yield dividends and across an advertiser’s agency network.

 

 

 

 

Ready to Embrace Full-Service Agencies Once Again?

24 Aug

full service advertising agency“Back in the day” is a catch phrase that many of us who came up in the ad business during the full-service agency, 15% commission era are accustomed to using when discussing the state of affairs within the industry today.

Things were simpler then for both marketers and ad agencies. Agencies were valued strategic partners, with C-Suite access that were tasked with developing brand positioning architectures, target segmentation schema and the creation and stewarding of brand communications across customer touchpoints. Marketers managed one full-service agency to handle all of the “above the line” branding and activation activities and maybe one or two “below the line” shops to handle tasks such as sales promotion and yellow pages advertising.

Fast forward to the here and now and the concept of “generalist” agencies, as full-service shops are often derogatorily referred to, has given way to specialization. As a result, marketers have seen the depth of their agency rosters swell in number to represent several to several dozen shops, each responsible for some, but not every aspect of a brand’s interaction with some, but not all segments of that brand’s target audience.

In the current “specialization” model, the challenges for marketers, particularly for those with limited staff resources, that don’t employ a full-service agency-of-record, are many. There are critical tasks and hand-offs which need to be addressed within the client organization and across their agency network, such as:

  • Who is responsible for marketing communications strategy development?
  • Who is on point for the integration and coordination of the communications program across touchpoints? Across media? Across target segments? Across geographies?
  • Who owns the agency relationships?

Factor in the challenges caused by evolving dynamics including organizational silos (i.e. digital versus traditional media), cross-channel marketing and attribution, big data and ad technology and the level of complexity, which marketers face grows to an almost dizzying height.

As to “who” is responsible, the obvious answer is that ownership of these tasks clearly resides with the client-side marketing team. This might help to explain why marketers are feeling stressed out, with many actually expressing a lack of confidence in their team’s ability.

Two short years ago Adobe conducted a survey of 1,000 U.S. marketers and found that only 40% of those surveyed felt that their company’s marketing efforts were effective. This same survey indicated that 68% of marketers were feeling “more pressure to show a return on investment on marketing spend” (ROMI). Earlier this year, Workfront surveyed 500 marketers and found that 25% felt “highly stressed” and 80% stated that they felt “overloaded and understaffed.”

It should go without saying that this is not a healthy dynamic for marketers and doesn’t seem to bode well for organizations seeking to optimize their ROMI.

One might realistically ask the question, are such organizational and or workload challenges impacting brand/ customer relationships? Some industry experts, such as Liz Miller, SVP of Marketing at the CMO council have suggested that consumers in fact have a disjointed perspective of certain brands, resulting in part from inconsistent experiences across touchpoints. In a recent interview with Marketing Daily, Ms. Miller suggested that the key issue facing marketers was delivering a “holistic, connected customer experience.”

Thus it would seem that in this era of specialization, deep agency rosters, headcount pressures on both client and agency organizations, rapidly evolving ad technologies and an empowered consumer, with a wide array of choices a return to “simpler” times would be welcome.

In our experience, advertisers that are successfully navigating this complex, rapidly changing market have done three things that are contributing to their success:

  1. Reduced the size of their agency rosters.
  2. Deputized an Agency-of-Record partner to share in the responsibility for developing strategies and orchestrating marketing activities to deliver a holistic brand experience.
  3. Placed a high premium on effective, collaborative communications with their agency partners and internal stakeholders to gain buy-in to the organization’s marketing communications efforts and to provide regular performance updates.

While a return to the “good ole days” may be nothing more than a fanciful wish, the concept of simplification remains a viable means of steadying the ship and allocating both advertiser and agency resources in a more efficient manner.

As American computer scientist Alan Perlis, once said;

Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it.”

 

4 Common LOA Oversights

2 Dec

client agency contractsWithout question, the single most important relationship management instrument for both advertisers and agencies alike is the letter-of-agreement (LOA).  At its most basic level, the LOA establishes the ground rules for each party along with their respective responsibilities during the relationship and afterwards, identifies agency deliverables and staffing commitments and spells out how the advertiser will compensate and evaluate the agency.

From an advertiser’s perspective, the LOA establishes critical legal and financial controls. These controls are designed to provide a level of protection and transparency required to assist the advertiser in effectively monitoring the agency’s stewardship of their advertising investment.  However, in spite of the importance of LOAs in safeguarding advertiser interests it is an area in which many advertisers fall short when it comes to securing their rights and protecting their interests.  The reasons for this range from insufficient industry specific experience among an advertiser’s legal and procurement team to the lack of an advertiser-centric agency contract template for utilization across an advertiser’s agency network.

In our agency contract compliance audit practice we have had the opportunity to review several hundred client-agency contracts including those that incorporate industry “Best Practice” language and others that limit an advertiser’s rights and leave them legally and financially exposed.  Over the course of this experience we have identified four common LOA oversights that advertisers should be mindful of when negotiating their agency agreements:

  1. Lack of a viable “Right to Audit” clause
  2. Failure to require the agency to track and report on their time investment and to reconcile fees
  3. Inadequate definitions surrounding agency remuneration models
  4. Failure to legally extend the agency’s obligations under the agreement to their affiliates

Without a comprehensive Right to Audit clause an advertiser is forgoing the single most important control mechanism available to protect and monitor their interest.  Advertisers would be well served to heed the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson;

“All promise outruns performance.”

Thus, advertisers should secure their right to review any facet of the agency’s compliance to the LOA and or their stewardship of the client’s advertising investment.  This would include, but not be limited to; fees/ commissions paid to the agency, the accuracy of agency time-of-staff reporting, assessing the accuracy and timeliness of third party vendor billing activities or reviewing the agency’s compliance with competitive bidding requirements.  Importantly, the Right to Audit clause should survive the termination of the relationship for a period of two to three years.    

Regardless of whether an agency is compensated based upon staffing investment levels, retainer fees tied to a statement-of-work (SOW), project fees or commissions it is imperative that the advertiser require the agency to track their time.  Ideally, time should be tracked by person, by day in quarter-hour increments by project/ task and reported back to the advertiser on a monthly basis.  This allows both client and agency the opportunity to assess the efficiency of the processes that are in place to guide project workflow and to identify means to refine and improve those processes.  Similarly, whether the remuneration is tied to an agency’s direct-labor investment or commissions tied to advertising spend the LOA should require that the fees/ commissions paid be reconciled on a quarterly basis.  Further, the LOA should specify how differences in planned activity or resource levels (over or under) will be squared up at the time of the quarterly reconciliation.

As agency compensation models have evolved over the years, so to have the number of components that go into the calculation of agency remuneration.  Of note, none of these components have standardized definitions.  Thus it is critical to clarify client-agency intent and understanding within the LOA by specifying what constitutes a full-time equivalent, what comprises direct labor or indirect overhead, is the commission rate established off of a gross or net base, etc…  Additionally, when and where possible, incorporate the use of examples to show the method to be utilized to calculate specific outcomes.

Finally, with the proliferation of agency holding companies and the myriad of mainstream agency and specialty services providers which they own it is likely that an advertiser is being served by many of those firms, with or without their knowledge.  Beyond creative, media, and digital resources these could include research firms, barter companies, production companies and trading desks.  The LOA should require that an agency fully disclose all intra-company transactions and assert that the LOA terms and conditions apply to and bind each of those affiliate companies as well as the agency-of-record.  This will insure full transparency for the advertiser while enhancing financial controls.

If you’re interested in learning more about how you might improve your agency contracts or the benefits of advertising agency contract compliance audits contact Cliff Campeau, Principal with Advertising Audit & Risk Management at ccampeau@aarmusa.com for your complimentary consultation.   

 

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